Stuffed Peppers with Currants, Dates and Capers

Recipe by Anna Hanau Serves 6-8 ¼ cup currants ¼ cup capers ¼ cup degelet noor dates, finely chopped (don’t use Medjool, they are too squishy to chop) ¼ red onion, chopped finely 1 teaspoon mustard 1 teaspoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon finely ground black pepper ½ teaspoon salt ½ cup chopped cilantro 1 cup…

Chuck Roast with a Tomato-Wine Sauce and Root Vegetables

Recipe adapted for kosher cooking from The New York Times. Serves 6-8. Ingredients: 3lbs Grow and Behold Chuck Roast 4 cups Grow and Behold Beef Bone Broth 3 tablespoons canola oil 4 tablespoons of schmaltz 2 medium red onions, cut into quarters 4 carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces 3 stalks celery, cut into…

Kimchi Stuffed Cabbage

JEFFREY: Stuffed cabbage is traditionally associated with the holiday of Sukkot, which falls during the autumn harvest when cabbage is king. Because cabbage is so ubiquitous in the region, many Slavic cultures have a tradition of stuffing cabbage leaves. The Jewish version usually involves ground beef and rice, and sometimes sauerkraut, too. We’ve included both a meat stuffing and a vegetarian lentil mushroom variation in this recipe. Instead of kraut, we fold in our spicy Ashkenazi Kimchi (page 68) to add an extra kick. Both versions of this recipe work great with sauerkraut, so feel free to substitute it wherever kimchi is indicated as an ingredient. You may need to drain the kimchi or sauerkraut in order to chop it, but reserve any excess brine and stir it into the sauce and filling. If using store-bought kimchi, we caution against purchasing only the spicy variety, which can be very, very hot. A mix of mild and spicy kimchi will balance perfectly with the added spice in this recipe. Note that this is a longer, more involved recipe.

Classic Holiday Brisket

Here is a delicious way to prepare brisket or other braising roasts with caramelized onions, beer, red wine and more.

Red Wine Top of the Rib

With only seven ingredients, transform this tender roast (or any braising roast such as Brisket or Deckel) into a tender, succulent feast.

Ground Beef with Kabocha and Tomato

A thick, rich sauce perfect for serving over rice or noodles, with great flavor from curry powder, Aleppo pepper and the sweet winter squash.

Makoud

This is a Tunisian casserole made with mashed potatoes, eggs and ground beef or lamb.

Time to Get Stuffed!

On Sukkot, a holiday of feasting and celebrating abundance, there is a tradition of eating stuffed foods — vegetables stuffed with ground meat or cheese, stuffed pastries, pastas, and anything you can fill with something delicious.  The foods symbolize our wishes for a year full of blessings, and, as Rachel Saks suggests, an opportunity to…